upward

upward
upward, upwards
1. The only form for the adjective is upward (in an upward direction), but upward and upwards are both used for the adverb, with a preference for upwards in BrE:

• The launcher consists of a small nozzle that directs a jet of water upward at an angle of approximately 45 degrees —Scientific American, 1973

• James had rounded off sums downwards rather than upwards —writing £900 for an actual £975 for example —K. M. E. Murray, 1977.

2. Upwards of (or occasionally upward of) is first recorded in the early 18c in the meaning ‘rather more than’ and remains in standard use:

• British Gas boiler installations cost upwards of £2,000, but you can get them much cheaper elsewhere —Sunday Times, 2007.

3. The adverb upwardly occurs mainly in the expression upwardly mobile, meaning ‘aspiring to social and professional advancement’.

Modern English usage. 2014.

Игры ⚽ Нужна курсовая?
Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Upward — may refer to: *Upward Bound *Upward Bound High School *Upward continuation *Upward looking sonar *Upward Spiral *Upwardly Global * Upwards (album)People: *Allen Upward *Edward Upward …   Wikipedia

  • upward — Ⅰ. upward UK US /ˈʌpwəd/ adjective ► moving towards a higher position, level, or value: upward climb/momentum/movement »London s shares maintained their upward momentum yesterday. upward curve/trend »The market has been on a steady upward trend… …   Financial and business terms

  • Upward — Up ward, Upwards Up wards, adv. [AS. upweardes. See {Up }, and { wards}.] [1913 Webster] 1. In a direction from lower to higher; toward a higher place; in a course toward the source or origin; opposed to downward; as, to tend or roll upward. I.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Upward of — Upward Up ward, Upwards Up wards, adv. [AS. upweardes. See {Up }, and { wards}.] [1913 Webster] 1. In a direction from lower to higher; toward a higher place; in a course toward the source or origin; opposed to downward; as, to tend or roll… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Upward — Up ward, a. [AS. upweard. See {Up}, and { ward}.] Directed toward a higher place; as, with upward eye; with upward course. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • upward — [up′wərd] adv., adj. [ME < OE upweard: see UP1 & WARD] 1. toward a higher place, position, degree, amount, etc. 2. on into future years or later life 3. beyond (an indicated price, amount, etc.) [tickets cost two dollars and upward]: Also… …   English World dictionary

  • Upward — Up ward, n. The upper part; the top. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] From the extremest upward of thy head. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • upward — O.E. upweard, upweardes; see UP (Cf. up) + WARD (Cf. ward). Cf. M.L.G. upwart, M.Du. opwaert, M.H.G. ufwart. Phrase upward mobility first recorded 1949; mainly restricted to sociologists jargon until 1960s …   Etymology dictionary

  • upward — ► ADVERB (also upwards) ▪ towards a higher point or level. ► ADJECTIVE ▪ moving or leading towards a higher point or level. ● upwards of Cf. ↑upwards of DERIVATIVES upwardly adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • Upward — Edward Upward (* 9. September 1903 in Repton, Derbyshire; † 13. Februar 2009 in Pontefract, West Yorkshire) war ein britischer Schriftsteller. Leben Upward besuchte die Schule in Repton, wo er Christopher Isherwood kennenlernte. Während des… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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